Low carb Paleo diet burns fat fast for weight loss, says ‘Eat the Yolks’ author

If you’ve banned high fat foods such as egg yolks, butter and beef from your diet and can’t lose weight, a nutritional therapy practitioner (NTP) says she knows the reason: You’re missing out on the fat-burning benefits of healthy fats. In an exclusive interview on Feb. 25, we talked with Liz Wolfe, NTP, about what she’s discovered when it comes to permanent weight loss and health.

Why the epidemic of obesity in our nation? Liz links it to “decades of the Standard American Diet, which leads to hormonal imbalance and out-of-control hunger.”

She’s convinced that our tendency to avoid fat is a large part of the problem. Our hormones need fats such as butter, beef and eggs, says Liz. And her new book’s title sums up her philosophy: “Eat the Yolks: Discover Paleo, fight food lies, and reclaim your health” (click for details).

Modern science proves that we need both fat and cholesterol, and “fat and cholesterol from ethically raised animal products, along with the fat-soluble vitamins that come with them, are vital to our health,” Liz told us.

And when it comes to the ideal diet for weight loss and health, Liz is a Paleo plan proponent. However, she does modify the traditional Paleo approach slightly by adding certain types of dairy.

“Paleo opens the door to a world of nourishing, delicious, appetite-regulating foods that many of us eliminated out of fear or simply forgot as a result of our standard diet rut,” she explains.

In contrast, “the standard American diet is based on restricting calories, restricting fat, eliminating fats and cholesterol from properly raised animals, and ignoring real food in favor of the profitable, nutrient-poor products we’re sold as if a so-called “whole grain” with a long ingredients label was somehow a true health food.”

Liz offers this insight on the benefits of whole grains: “That’s propaganda, pure and simple.”

So what really works for weight loss? To become what Liz calls an “efficient fat-burner,” dish up “healthy fats and cholesterol, properly-raised animals and the fat-soluble vitamins that come with them, and whole vegetables and fruits of all kinds. ”

A typical day in Liz’s own “Eat the Yolks” diet includes:

A ginger-lemon tea or glass of beet kvass.
Breakfast is eggs from our free-range flock, over sweet potato or taro root with a dollop of goat cheese or butter from grass-fed cows.
Lunch is quick: wild-caught sardines straight from the can – a fantastic, budget-conscious, low-food-chain source of Omega 3, calcium and protein – with leftover sautéed rainbow chard and other veggies, like roasted carrots or beets left over from dinner the night before.
Dinner might be soup or stew, made with homemade broth in the pressure cooker (another time-saver), or tomato sauce with ground beef over spaghetti squash, a favorite ten-minute meal.

For those who are vegetarians, Liz suggests modifying the traditional approach by incorporating “the right types of dairy products, eggs, and bivalve seafood like oysters.”

Liz feels that “eliminating processed grain products and packaged foods is 95% of the battle for most of us; from there, it’s simply tweaking to achieve our goals while paying close attention to how we feel.”

Rachel Frederickson talks ‘Biggest Loser’ weight loss: ‘Absolutely healthy’

Controversy swirled almost the moment that “Biggest Loser” season 15 contestant Rachel Frederickson stepped on the stage of the finale on Feb. 4. Had the 24-year-old lost too much weight? Nearly a month after her win, she addressed the backlash about her 155-pound loss today with Savannah Guthrie of the “Today” show.

“I felt amazing on the stage, I felt like I shined in my dress, and I got off the stage and Twitter was all abuzz,” she said Wednesday morning in New York. “There was just so much chatter about it.”

She said she was surprised at the social media reaction.

“My journey was my own and I loved it, I lived it, so I felt really proud of what I did,” Frederickson said.

When Guthrie asked whether she thought she had dropped down to an unhealthy weight, Frederickson disagreed.

“It was absolutely healthy weight loss. I dieted, I exercised and did it healthy the whole way,” she said. “I appreciate all the concern and I can see where it comes from. And there is the ‘movie magic’ – it’s over 7 months, it’s almost a year of my life losing the weight. So I was very unhealthy at 260 pounds and now, post finale, I’m the healthiest, most alive I’ve ever felt.”

This week, “Today” is focusing on body image with its “Love Your Selfie” week, and Guthrie asked Frederickson what lessons she learned from her mom about her body image growing up as a competitive swimmer.

“She has taught me to be independent, to love myself and to be me,” she said.

In maintenance mode now and visibly less gaunt looking than on finale night, Guthrie asked Frederickson whether she worries about backsliding.

“That thought always comes up but I think that what I’ve learned is that I have an inner strength. I have a voice and I can trust myself. I didn’t trust myself. I was critical and I judged myself,” she said. “You’re with you the rest of your life so you’d better accept you and love yourself.”

Dr. Oz unveils detox diet to revitalize metabolism: Lose 10 pounds in 10 days

Can you give your metabolism a makeover that boosts fat-burning and weight loss? Yes, says Dr Mehmet Oz. On his Feb. 24 talk show, Dr. Oz unveiled a new detox diet that helps you shed up to 10 pounds and prevent disease in just 10 days.

Dr. Oz explained that his detox diet is based on the research and weight loss program designed by his guest expert, Dr. Mark Hyman, author of “The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet: Activate Your Body’s Natural Ability to Burn Fat and Lose Weight Fast” (click for details).

Dr. Hyman says that benefits of the 10-day detox plan include:

  • Lose up to 10 pounds
  • Reverse chronic health problems such as joint point and type 2 diabetes
  • Alleviate brain fog and allergies
  • Prevent conditions such as acne and headaches
  • Help autoimmune disease

However, he told Dr. Oz that to succeed with both weight loss and prevention of disease, you will need to eliminate the following foods from your meals and snacks during the 10-day period:

  • Processed foods unless it is a canned whole food such as sardines or artichokes with only a few real ingredients such as water or salt
  • Any food or drink that contains added sugar (including honey, molasses, agave, maple syrup, organic cane juice or artificial sweeteners), especially any sugar-sweetened beverages or fruit juices
  • Anything that contains hydrogenated oils and refined vegetable oils (like corn or soybean oil)
  • Any foods with artificial sweeteners, preservatives, additives, coloring, or dyes
  • Anything sugar or flour based (cookies, cakes, candies, etc.)
  • Grains (rice, oats, quinoa) and all foods made from flours (crackers, pasta, bread, pretzels, etc.)
  • Starches (sweet potato, potato, squash, parsnip, beets, etc.)
  • Beans and legumes (chickpeas, lentils, peanuts, kidney beans, etc.)
  • Dairy (yogurt, sour cream, cheese, milk, etc.)
  • Coffee and anything caffeinated (tea, soft drinks, lattes, etc.)
  • Alcohol (wine, beer, spirits, etc.)

High carbohydrate diets linked to dementia: Eat healthy fats, say experts

Want to reduce your risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s? The latest studies show that the key to achieving that goal is simple: Eliminate carbohydrates such as sugar and grains and replace them with healthy fats, reported the Sacramento Bee on Feb. 21.

Spanish researchers evaluated the impact of diets on cognition, dividing study group participants ages 50 to 80 into three different groups:

  • One group ate a Mediterranean-style diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil
  • A second group followed a similar diet but supplement it with extra nuts rather than olive oil
  • The third group consumed a low fat diet with carbohydrates such as whole grains

The results after 6.5 years on these diets: Participants who ate the diet high in extra-virgin olive oil scored best on cognition tests, followed by those who ate nuts. The lowest scores came from those who avoided fat and ate grains.

Mediterranean diets traditionally include healthy fats such as nuts and olive oil, with total calorie intake from fats as high as 40 percent. Also included: Vegetables, fruits, nuts and legumes, with moderate to high consumption of fish and seafood and low consumption of dairy and meat. Processed grains are kept to a minimum.

What’s the link between this high fat diet and cognition? Studies show that such diets result in lower blood concentrations of inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein and reduced risk factors for vascular disease such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Both inflammation and vascular disease are known risk factors in dementia and cognitive decline.

Contrasted with such high fat, low carb diets, the standard American diet (SAD) poses risks in its high percentages of processed grains and sugars.

SAD menus result in elevated blood sugar and insulin resistance, causing glycation of proteins.Through this process, glucose molecules attach to proteins, and that’s been associated with reductions in cognitive function.

Dr. Oz: Fenugreek fights diabetes; eat fat-burning snacks for weight loss

If you’re concerned about diabetes, you know that blood sugar spikes can be serious. On his Feb. 21 talk show, Dr. Mehmet Oz revealed how fenugreek can stabilize blood sugar and fight diabetes. Plus: Discover new Oz-approved fat-burning snacks to accelerate your weight loss.

Fenugreek slows down your body’s digestion of carbohydrates while decreasing the absorption of glucose. As a result, it can help to control your blood sugar while battling diabetes, says Dr. Oz.

How to use: Add the seeds as a spice to meals. It’s particularly good in vegetable dishes or soups. Dr. Oz recommends one tablespoon a day.

Where to find: Look in the grocery store or online, such as Starwest Botanicals Organic Fenugreek Seed.

Also featured on the same episode, Dr. Oz dished up his new weight loss discoveries: Snacks that actually boost your body’s ability to burn fat.

Dr. Oz recommends:

  • Use figs as snacks to reduce your hunger and burn fat faster. Tip: Look for brands without added sugar and chemicals, such as Indus Organic Turkish Jumbo Dried Figs (click for details).
  • Licorice root blocks an enzyme that plays a role in fat accumulation and helps control cravings. You can also find it in tea form, such as Yogi Egyptian Licorice Tea.
  • Protein-packed pistachios help you stay full, reducing your cravings. Tip: If you have a problem with portion control, look for mini bags, such as 130-calorie bags of Wonderful Pistachios.
  • Hydrating watermelon supports your metabolism. Try one cup in a smoothie to lose weight more easily.
  • High in polyunsaturated fats, pine nuts make your body burn calories faster. Dr. Oz suggests two tablespoons three times a week. Look for pine nuts in health food stores or online, such as Good Sense Pine nuts.
  • Make snacks that use beans, which have soluble fiber and reduce fattening inflammation. Try the recipe below as an example.

Midnight Brownies

This recipe was created by Kim, a guest of “The Dr. Oz Show” who lost more than 200 pounds. The secret ingredient: black beans. Kim authored a book about how she lost the weight: “Finally Thin!: How I Lost More Than 200 Pounds and Kept Them Off–and How You Can, Too” (click for details).

Ingredients

  • 1 (15 oz.) can black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1/2 cup agave syrup
  • 1/2 cup self-rising flour
  • 1/2 cup egg whites
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
  • 2 tbsp vanilla
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 6 tbsp mini semisweet chocolate chips

Directions

Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly spray a 8×8 baking dish with nonstick cooking spray. In a food processor, mix all brownie ingredients (except chips) together. Chop on high, until smooth. Clean off sides and blend for another 20 seconds. Add the chips and stir well. Spread into the 8×8 baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes, until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for about 1 hour at room temperature.

Frosting
Ingredients

  • 6 oz. fat-free cream cheese
  • 1/4 cup agave syrup
  • 2 tbsp vanilla extract
  • 2 tbsp semisweet mini chocolate chips, melted

Directions

With a whisk attachment on an electric beater, blend all ingredients until light and fluffy. Spread evenly over the top of the cooled brownies. In a microwave safe bowl, melt the 2 tbsp of chips with a 2-second spray of nonstick cooking oil. Using a spoon, swirl the chocolate on top. Allow it to set in the refrigerator for 20 minutes. Serve and enjoy.

Dr. Oz talks extreme weight loss ‘thigh gap’ diets and magnesium energy boosters

For several years, girls, teens and young women have been obsessed with achieving the newest slim sensation: Thigh Gaps. But their extreme weight loss plans can pose dangers, according to Dr. Mehmet Oz. On his Feb. 25 talk show, Dr. Oz explored thigh gap diets. Plus: Find out how to boost your energy with magnesium.

As an example of how these diets can become obsessive, Dr. Oz talked with Camille Hugh, author of “The Thigh Gap Hack: The Shortcut to Slimmer, Feminine Thighs Every Woman Secretly Desires” (click for details). Camille feels that her book does a service in offering tricks such as overcoming hunger, exercises and focusing primarily on very low calorie foods. She defended her desire to achieve the thigh gap look.

However, Dr. Oz is concerned that books and views such as Camille’s can lead to eating disorders. He asked eating disorder specialist Dr. Jennifer Thomas to offer her insights.

Author of “Almost Anorexic: Is My (or My Loved One’s) Relationship with Food a Problem? (The Almost Effect),” Dr. Thomas notes that Camille’s emphasis on extreme weight loss and low body fat parallels the development of anorexia. By obsessing on those goals, young girls are at risk of developing eating disorders.

In addition to the emotional aspects of anorexia, girls focused on developing thigh gaps put their health at risk, warned Dr. Oz. They may lose muscle, which impacts the metabolism and even can affect the heart.

Note: This week is National Eating Disorders Week, designed to spread awareness: Learn more by clicking here. And find out about resources on eating disorders, from memoirs to DVDs to self-help guides, by clicking here.

Also on the show, Dr. Oz discussed magnesium for energy and health. Symptoms of insufficient magnesium include constipation, anxiety, fatigue and muscle spasms. Studies show that up to 75 percent of American adults lack enough magnesium.

To boost your magnesium levels, eat these foods:

  • kidney beans
  • black beans
  • brown rice
  • quinoa
  • bran cereal

‘Super Shred’ vs ‘Doctor’s Diet’: Physicians debate merits of weight loss plans

So you want to lose weight. What could be better than a diet plan created by one of the well-known physicians on the popular health talk show “The Doctors,” two of whom have created their own weight loss programs? The challenge in choosing one of those plans: Dr. Ian Smith provides very different diet tactics in his “Super Shred” diet when compared to Dr. Travis Stork’s “The Doctor’s Diet,” reported USA Today on Feb. 23.

Dr. Ian says he believes that the key to rapid weight loss is “calorie disruption,” and contends that his diet can help dieters lose 20 pounds in four weeks: “Super Shred: The Big Results Diet: 4 Weeks 20 Pounds Lose It Faster!”

The “Super Shred” weight loss program alternates calorie counts, up to 1,600 calories on some days and down to 900 calories on other days. Included are grocery lists, meal plans and recipes. Dieters are advised to perform 40 minutes or more of high-intensity interval aerobic exercise a day.

In addition to calorie disruption, Dr. Ian tells dieters to snack frequently, including specifics on timing. He also emphasizes what he calls “sliding nutrient density,” which means that you eat plant-based foods in the second part of your day.

In contrast, Dr. Travis focuses on food prescriptions so that your meals and snacks become your medicine: “The Doctor’s Diet: Dr. Travis Stork’s STAT Program to Help You Lose Weight & Restore Your Health”.

Although the “Doctor’s Diet” emphasizes health and weight loss equally, Dr. Travis does provide a four-week jump-start to accelerate weight loss, followed by diet to continue the weight loss and concluding with a maintenance plan. That four-week plan emphasizes healthy fats, moderately high protein and low-carb diet meals and snacks.

As for Dr. Ian’s emphasis on high-intensity exercise for 40 minutes, Dr. Travis prescribes only 30 minutes of an activity such as walking. In addition, Dr. Travis feels strongly about the dangers of sugar, telling dieters to surrender the sweet stuff while boosting their protein intake. While not eliminating carbohydrates, he says that those who engage in only minimal activity can benefit from low carb diets.

“We don’t know exactly why protein helps with weight loss. One reason is that it has an impact on the action of ghrelin, known as the hunger hormone, and leptin, the satiety hormone, which is why people who eat protein at each meal find they are fuller and less hungry after they eat than do people who skimp on protein,” he explains.